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White Sox problems always more interesting than other teams problems

Chris Sale received a slap on the wrist from general manager Rick Hahn on Sunday after becoming the first player in White Sox history suspended for destroying uniforms.

Sale’s five game suspension means he’ll miss only one start, a nice little rest for the face of the organization and fan favorite.

Hahn took pains to say Sale is still a valued part of the Sox organization,wholesale nfl jerseys from china that he did not ask to be traded and did not lose any trade value despite the bizarre uniform slicing incident on Saturday.

Sale’s crazy plan to get out of wearing the throwbacks reminded some of the “Seinfeld” episode in which George Costanza tied the Yankees’ World Series trophy to the back of his car and dragged it around in an effort to be fired by owner George Steinbrenner.

“I fear no reprisals,” Costanza shouted into a megaphone.

Sale had no megaphone but obviously did not fear the consequences of his act. And if he really was trying to escape the Sox, sabotaging the throwbacks was as good a way as any of saying: “Get me out of here.”

Costanza’s ploy backfired, as did Sale’s, though he was not at the ballpark Sunday to explain his motives. Todd Frazier and James Shields said the players had his back, while manager Robin Ventura pretended it was no big deal.

Basically the company line can be summed up in three words:

Sale being Sale.

Chris Sale needs to end petulance, but White Sox played part too David Haugh

The face of the White Sox franchise with a temper as nasty as his slider, Chris Sale overreacted Saturday when he slashed throwback uniforms he didn’t feel comfortable wearing.

Being a cut above the rest of American League pitchers still doesn’t give the left handed ace of the Sox staff the right.

The face of the White Sox franchise with a temper as nasty as his slider, Chris Sale overreacted Saturday when he slashed throwback uniforms he didn’t feel comfortable wearing.

Being a cut above the rest of American League pitchers still doesn’t give the left handed ace of the Sox staff the right.”When he believes he’s in the right, he goes full bore after it,” Hahn said.

So was Sale in the right?

If the reports are accurate, Sale wanted to switch jerseys because the throwbacks were uncomfortable, and he argued the Sox were putting marketing ahead of winning. The Sox do a lousy job of marketing their players, including Sale, so they need giveaways to help draw fans.

That doesn’t mean the players have to wear the uniforms they’re giving away. But Sale probably should’ve just sucked it up and complained afterward if it affected his performance.

Hahn said Sale “expressed the rationale behind his actions” and understood he would be disciplined for it. But it didn’t sound as though Sale was remorseful for his actions.

Hahn said “we both expressed remorse that it got to that point.”Sale is considered a good guy, but he does have a tendency to snap on occasion.

“Part of what makes Chris elite is his passion and commitment,” Hahn said. “We’ve seen that sometimes spill out from between the white lines. (Saturday) was one of those instances.”

Former Cub Carlos Zambrano, one of the great “snappers” of all time, would’ve killed to have Hahn as his GM instead of Jim Hendry, who called him a “tired act” after Zambrano’s shouting match with Derrek Lee at the Cell.

Ventura and pitching coach Don Cooper should be the ones keeping Sale in line, but both failed. Sale needs some tough love, not enabling. Ventura said he had not spoken to Sale before Sunday’s game.

I ventured into the stands Sunday to ask Sox fans what they thought of Sale’s actions and the Sox’s reaction. The general consensus was that Sale didn’t deserve any punishment.

“Let him choose the uniform when he pitches,” said Phil Trinidad, 19, of Chicago. “I’m sure he was just frustrated by the trade rumors. I want to see him pitch against the Cubs.”

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